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+47 73 89 08 00
postmottak.ndr@kirken.no
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Bispegata 11, 7012 Trondheim

Nidaros Cathedral is one of the top attractions in Norway.

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Nidaros Cathedral


Nidaros Cathedral is the world’s northernmost medieval cathedral and Norway’s national sanctuary. The Cathedral is the grave church of St. Olav, the patron Saint of Norway. In addition to it now being one of Europe’s major historical pilgrim destinations, coronations and royal blessings take place in the church.

Open guided tours
During the main season (June – August) we offer guided tours in Norwegian, English, German and French for everyone who wishes to learn more about the Cathedral’s exciting history. In addition, you can join our guided tours in the Archbishop Palace. These tours are in Norwegian and English, and give you the rare chance to explore the large hall and private rooms from the Middle Ages. The rest of the year, we offer guided tours in Norwegian during the weekends.

If you wish to take a guided tour in another language outside the main season, please contact us in advance.

How to book a tour
You can book a guided tour at any time of the year. We can offer day and evening tours in several languages – Norwegian, English, German and French. For smaller groups it is possible to book special theme tours. These excursions provide the unique opportunity of visiting the upper- and lower-floors of the cathedral, which are usually closed for the public.

To book a guided tour please contact us on email: booking.ndr@kirken.no or call us at 73 89 08 00. Please note that your reservation is confirmed when you receive a replay from us.

Construction
Trondheim was traditionally protected with fortifications by the river Nidelven and Skansen, but the city was vulnerable to attack from the east. The Fortress was therefore put on a hill to protect the city centre and control the area from Ila to Lade. General Johan Caspar von Cicignon, who was chief inspector of kuks fortifications, was responsible for the new town plan of Trondheim after the great fire of 18 April 1681. He also made the plans for the construction of Kristiansten Fortress.

The fortress was built during the period from 1682 to 1684 and strengthened to a complete defence fortification in 1691 by building an advanced post Kristiandsands bastion in the east and in 1695 with the now vanished Møllenberg skanse by the river Nidelven. These fortifications were encircled by a continuous palisade and thereby connected to the fortified city. In 1750 the fortress was modernized with new bastions and casemates to protect against mortar artillery. Two new isolated defensive works were also built to the east – Grüner’s and Frølich’s redoubts – but they are hardly visible today.